Skip to main content

News Home

Grand Challenges research effort leverages STEM to inspire climate action

The RISE with Insects research team includes, from left, Susan Weller, director of the University of Nebraska State Museum; Sarah Roberts, Extension educator in science and nature education for early childhood; Ana María Vélez Arango, assistant professor of insect toxicology; Louise Lynch-O’Brien, assistant professor of insect biology and Extension specialist; and Holly Hatton-Bowers, associate professor of child, youth and family studies and Extension specialist. Learn more about this project in the CYFS Research Network.

After decades of work, many researchers believe climate change poses the greatest global threat to human health — and that youth are the most vulnerable to the impacts and most-dire consequences, both today and in the future.

Black, Latinx, Native American and other youth of color may be disproportionately affected by climate change with deepening inequalities in access to clean air and water, healthy foods and forced migration. Full Article

Multi-institutional study explores how students approach course work once class ends

Researchers investigating undergraduate students’ strategies for completing out-of-class homework include, front row, from left: Allison Upchurch, Dana Kirkwood-Watts and Brian Couch. Back row, from left: Lorey Wheeler, Kati Brazeal, Sarah Spier and Gabrielle Johnson. Learn more about this project in the CYFS Research Network.

As learning environments increasingly rely on online course formats that work with busy college student schedules — particularly after disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic — a better understanding of how students complete out-of-class assignments is crucial to ensuring equitable opportunities for academic success. Full Article

Study: Sleep deficits add up during busy seasons for farmers, ranchers

Data from a recent study found that during peak seasons — planting, harvesting and calving — farmers and ranchers spent about 25 fewer minutes in bed and 28 fewer minutes actually sleeping each night. Learn more in the CYFS Research Network.

As any agricultural worker will readily admit, occasional sleep deprivation is all part of the job.

But for farmers and ranchers who routinely work around livestock and machinery, bad things can happen when sleepiness leads to lack of concentration, slower reaction times or distractibility. Full Article

Interdisciplinary program takes long-range view of visual impairment instruction

Mackenzie Savaiano, associate professor of practice in the Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, is leading a project to recruit and train new teachers to meet the needs of students with visual impairments. Learn more in the CYFS Research Network.

According to a recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Ophthalmology, the number of American preschool children with visual impairment is projected to increase by more than 25 percent in the coming decades, with most visual impairment resulting from simple uncorrected vision problems that interfere with clear sight. Full Article

Research assessing impacts, solutions of sex trafficking of Native Americans

Researchers in Iowa, Nebraska and South Dakota are using two U.S. Department of Justice grants — one from the National Institute of Justice, the other from the Office on Violence Against Women — to examine the impacts of sex trafficking on Native American survivors and communities. Learn more in the CYFS Research Network.

Although Native American women and girls experience disproportionally high rates of sex trafficking, little is known about the impact that sex trafficking has specifically on Native survivors — or what Native survivors need to heal and achieve safety and justice. Full Article

Researchers collaborate at Early Head Start University Partnership Data Camp

Researchers from four universities involved in the Early Head Start University Partnership met May 4-5 at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln to discuss expanding the knowledge base of early childcare and education programs. From left, HyeonJin Yoon, Lorey Wheeler, Ann Michele Stacks, Sue Sheridan, Johayra Bouza, Beth Van Horne, Sandra Scruggs and Lisa Knoche. Learn more about the project in the CYFS Research Network.

Research teams from four universities gathered May 4 and 5 at the Nebraska Union to discuss expanding knowledge and support of Early Head Start and other early care and education programs.

During the two-day Early Head Start University Research Partnership Data Camp, researchers collaborated in-person and virtually on a variety of topics, including parent-teacher relationships, infant/toddler well-being in Early Head Start center-based care and provider professional development. Full Article

2022 Summit on Research in Early Childhood helps connect research, practice, policy

Participants gather during the 2022 CYFS Summit on Research in Early Childhood at the Nebraska Innovation Campus Conference Center on April 13. View photo gallery.

Creating connections among early childhood research, practice and policy — and how each can enhance the lives of young children and their families — provided the central theme of the 2022 CYFS Summit on Research in Early Childhood.

Nearly 200 attendees, including researchers from across the University of Nebraska system, practitioners, administrators, community partners and policymakers, gathered April 13 at Nebraska Innovation Campus for the daylong, sixth biennial summit, which highlighted the latest research to advance early childhood education and development, and implications for practice and policy. Full Article

TAPP brings new tool to students, parents and teachers in Brazil

From left, Renata T.M. Gomes, CYFS graduate research assistant and doctoral candidate, and Natalie Williams, associate professor and graduate chair in the Department of Child, Youth and Family Studies, discuss TAPP during a meeting at the Maria Cecilia Souto Vidigal Foundation in Brazil. Gomes is leading a project to introduce TAPP to students in Brazil. Learn more in the CYFS Research Network.

As students in Brazil slowly return to in-person learning following the COVID-19 pandemic, some are being introduced to a program designed to foster parent-teacher partnerships to help boost children’s academic and social and emotional success.

Renata T.M. Gomes, CYFS graduate research assistant and doctoral candidate, is leading the effort to bring Teachers and Parents as Partners (TAPP) to Brazil. Full Article