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Interdisciplinary program takes long-range view of visual impairment instruction

Mackenzie Savaiano, associate professor of practice in the Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, is leading a project to recruit and train new teachers to meet the needs of students with visual impairments. Learn more in the CYFS Research Network.

According to a recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Ophthalmology, the number of American preschool children with visual impairment is projected to increase by more than 25 percent in the coming decades, with most visual impairment resulting from simple uncorrected vision problems that interfere with clear sight. Full Article

Research assessing impacts, solutions of sex trafficking of Native Americans

Researchers in Iowa, Nebraska and South Dakota are using two U.S. Department of Justice grants — one from the National Institute of Justice, the other from the Office on Violence Against Women — to examine the impacts of sex trafficking on Native American survivors and communities. Learn more in the CYFS Research Network.

Although Native American women and girls experience disproportionally high rates of sex trafficking, little is known about the impact that sex trafficking has specifically on Native survivors — or what Native survivors need to heal and achieve safety and justice. Full Article

Researchers collaborate at Early Head Start University Partnership Data Camp

Researchers from four universities involved in the Early Head Start University Partnership met May 4-5 at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln to discuss expanding the knowledge base of early childcare and education programs. From left, HyeonJin Yoon, Lorey Wheeler, Ann Michele Stacks, Sue Sheridan, Johayra Bouza, Beth Van Horne, Sandra Scruggs and Lisa Knoche. Learn more about the project in the CYFS Research Network.

Research teams from four universities gathered May 4 and 5 at the Nebraska Union to discuss expanding knowledge and support of Early Head Start and other early care and education programs.

During the two-day Early Head Start University Research Partnership Data Camp, researchers collaborated in-person and virtually on a variety of topics, including parent-teacher relationships, infant/toddler well-being in Early Head Start center-based care and provider professional development. Full Article

2022 Summit on Research in Early Childhood helps connect research, practice, policy

Participants gather during the 2022 CYFS Summit on Research in Early Childhood at the Nebraska Innovation Campus Conference Center on April 13. View photo gallery.

Creating connections among early childhood research, practice and policy — and how each can enhance the lives of young children and their families — provided the central theme of the 2022 CYFS Summit on Research in Early Childhood.

Nearly 200 attendees, including researchers from across the University of Nebraska system, practitioners, administrators, community partners and policymakers, gathered April 13 at Nebraska Innovation Campus for the daylong, sixth biennial summit, which highlighted the latest research to advance early childhood education and development, and implications for practice and policy. Full Article

TAPP brings new tool to students, parents and teachers in Brazil

From left, Renata T.M. Gomes, CYFS graduate research assistant and doctoral candidate, and Natalie Williams, associate professor and graduate chair in the Department of Child, Youth and Family Studies, discuss TAPP during a meeting at the Maria Cecilia Souto Vidigal Foundation in Brazil. Gomes is leading a project to introduce TAPP to students in Brazil. Learn more in the CYFS Research Network.

As students in Brazil slowly return to in-person learning following the COVID-19 pandemic, some are being introduced to a program designed to foster parent-teacher partnerships to help boost children’s academic and social and emotional success.

Renata T.M. Gomes, CYFS graduate research assistant and doctoral candidate, is leading the effort to bring Teachers and Parents as Partners (TAPP) to Brazil. Full Article

Researchers, teachers, artists collaborate to envision future of emerging media instruction

Art TEAMS researchers include, from left, Guy Trainin, professor of education in the Department of Teaching, Learning & Teacher Education; Lorinda Rice, Lincoln Public Schools art curriculum specialist; HyeonJin Yoon, research assistant professor, MAP Academy; and Kimberly D’Adamo, TLTE graduate student/lecturer. Learn more in the CYFS Research Network.

Given the speed at which technology changes and evolves, one can only imagine what media will look like in five years — and beyond.

But Nebraska researchers are collaborating with the state’s K-12 educators, artists and administrators to do just that. Full Article

Resource toolkit enables Nebraska Extension personnel to Reach Out for Wellness

Nebraska researchers have developed a toolkit of resources to help Extension professionals cope with the challenges of their work — and seek support — through better understanding of their own well-being. Learn more in the CYFS Research Network.

As frontline caregiving professionals, Nebraska Extension professionals provide vital assistance to communities during the state’s disaster response and recovery efforts, and offer a lifeline for many struggling to cope during times of crisis.

Holly Hatton-Bowers, assistant professor of child, youth and family studies, is the program director of a national project funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and housed at CYFS, focused on supporting the wellness of Extension personnel following natural disasters. Full Article

Brain-connected technology opens communications doors for those with severe physical impairments

Kevin Pitt, assistant professor of special education and communication disorders, prepares an EEG cap for use on a P300 speller device (Photo by Kelcey Buck, Special Education and Communication Disorders). Learn more in the CYFS Research Network.

As computer technology continues to evolve and become more routine in daily life, researchers and engineers alike are working to find new ways to link computer technology with the human brain.

Using a direct communication pathway between a wired brain and an external device to produce commands is no longer the stuff of science fiction. Brain-computer interface, or BCI, is now evolving reality — and one that promises enhanced quality of life for people with severe physical impairments (SPIs). Full Article